January 16, 2015

You shoot a lot, you hope a little and you’re grateful to get just one or two.


Harbinger No. 22 – Tongariki

I’m back from Easter Island and have begun working on the several thousand images I shot. Many were very long exposures and that gave me lots of time to think, and one thought that I had was:

You shoot a lot, you hope a little and you’re grateful to get just one or two.

And that’s the truth: I shot a lot of images and while I’m hoping for several good ones, I’ll be grateful to get just a few. It’s funny how when you’re viewing images in the field every one looks like a killer, but the reality is that the public will only see about 1 out of every 250 images that I shoot. 

And while it’s important to create great images, it’s almost equally as important to only show the good ones!

~~~

I’ll be presenting my work to the Alpenglow Camera Club in Granby, Colorado on Wednesday, February 4th.

My presentation is entitled “Why Black and White?” and we will be meeting at the Granby Public Library at 7 pm.

If you’re in the area, I’d love to meet you!

Cole

11 thoughts on “You shoot a lot, you hope a little and you’re grateful to get just one or two.

  1. As Gerry says, above, this is a great new harbinger image! I love the composition, and, if I may say it, sense of humor (or almost) of the moai “looking up.”

    “And while it’s important to create great images, it’s almost equally as important to only show the good ones!”

    Such an important point! It is so tempting in our “shoot it and post it” world to join in!

  2. Welcome back! Nice to see there are harbingers in the middle of the Pacific. I like how the cloud cover along the horizon sets off the moai.

  3. Awesome image. That Harbinger is such a great series.

    I think that 1/250 is such an interesting data point. I’ve often wondered what that ratio is for other photographers. I could be way off, but my guess is I’m at about 1/50 or so.

  4. Great image! Can’t wait to see more.
    I think the public only sees the images that meet the standards of our vision. And I imagine that are some high standards, as they should be, in my humble opinion.

  5. Quite agree with you Cole on these percentages.
    Sometimes though, editing images can be like a crossword puzzle you can’t quite solve, put it down, come back a few hours later and everything makes perfect sense. I shot out in New Mexico this past July and was going through the images recently and discovered two that I had continually passed over. It may be a case of vision and revision.

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